SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2014

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Psalm 148, 149, 150; Isaiah 5: 1-7; Luke 7: 28-35

Advent can be a frustrating time. Like all times of waiting, there is necessarily a feeling of uneasiness or uncertainty. We believe that we know what will arrive, but until the day comes, we really only have hopes and dreams—and maybe some fears. The reality is always somewhat different than our fantasy. John the Baptizer came eating no bread and drinking no wine, and people were unhappy with his example. When Jesus appeared, he came eating and drinking, and the people didn’t like that any better. We’re rarely satisfied with what we receive. We prefer the imaginary perfection of our dreams to the very concrete perfection of what God provides.

This season, as each of us prepares for Christ to be born into the world, try not to tell God what you want. Instead,
take seriously the uncomfortable discipline of truly waiting on God. And then practice the joyful acceptance of God’s gift of what will be born into your life. It may not be the gift you expected, but it will surely be the gift you needed, for God is a loving giver of only the best gifts.

 

Holy God, giver of all good gifts, help us in this season of waiting, not to be anxious, but to wait upon you. Amen.


The Rev. Micah T.J. Jackson, PhD
Dean of Community Life
Bishop John Hines Associate Professor in Preaching
Seminary of the Southwest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Micah Jackson is the Bishop John Hines Associate Professor of Preaching and serves as Dean of Community Life. Professor Jackson joined Seminary of the Southwest faculty in June 2008. His academic interests include the spiritual discipline of preaching, homiletic form, and postmodern construction of the relationship between preacher and congregation. His previous courses have ranged from "New Media in Worship and Preaching" to "Political Preaching" and "The Preacher's Self." Professor Jackson is a popular instructor at the Episcopal Preaching Foundation's Preaching Excellence Program, having served on the faculty since 2008. He is also a member of the EPF Board of Directors. He had been Associated Clergy at St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Berkeley for two years before moving to Austin. He and his family worship in Austin at St. David's, where he serves as an Assisting Priest.
 
MDiv, Meadville Lombard Theological School; MTS, Seabury-Western Theological Seminary; PhD, Graduate Theological Union.